Now You Can Donate Your Leftover Subway Fare To Charity, With A Simple Swipe

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Now You Can Donate Your Leftover Subway Fare To Charity, With A Simple Swipe

Now that he was in New York, the £5.60 stuck on his London transit pass—called an Oyster Card—had become permanently useless.
Whitehurst has created a system in which subway riders can simply swipe their cards against a special RFID-reading panel to donate extra change. Tapping the Oyster Card against a “Common Pence” panel relieves it of 50 pence, while continuing to press the card against the panel drains the Oyster Card fully.

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via commonpence.co

This Dynamic Duo From Vietnam Has A Plan To Cut Down On Pollution

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This Dynamic Duo From Vietnam Has A Plan To Cut Down On Pollution

The partners have produced about 220 pounds of mushrooms so far, and diverted about a ton of straw. But it’s early days. The $250,000 prize from the Postcode Lottery Green Challenge will go towards a full processing facility, more trainings for the farmers, and, importantly, salaries for the founders.

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via fargreenvn.wordpress.com

China enters the era of social impact investing

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China enters the era of social impact investing

China and the United States take the first steps in collaborating on social impact investment.
At the conference, a U.S. training program for Chinese entrepreneurs who seek to engage in social impact investing was announced. The training, to take place in 2015, will be jointly carried out by CSRDC and Columbia Business School.

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via prnewswire.com

We don’t care about profits. We don’t care about workers. Read between the lines.

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We don’t care about profits. We don’t care about workers. Read between the lines.

The homeless and cash-starved are merely kept alive while nothing changes. In actuality, austerity measures are felt on the ground and essential social services are woefully inadequate. We’ve woken up outside on most days and often walked miles before breakfast with a pack on my back.

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via theguardian.com

Ice Buckets and the Psychology of Giving

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Ice Buckets and the Psychology of Giving

Researchers are fairly convinced that in many cases we like to give for very selfish reasons, and this may have fed the ice-bucket brigade.
One interesting theory behind group events that benefit charities describes what has been called the “martyrdom effect.” Dousing yourself with very cold water probably does not feel very good.
Despite the ice-bucket challenge’s popularity and the plethora of new ways to give, Americans are still giving at only about two percent of their incomes.
These increasingly ingenious challenges that are popping up are responses to the need to work harder and harder for a slice of a pie that is not getting bigger.

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via nonprofitquarterly.org