Remote Mexican village uses solar power to purify water

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Remote Mexican village uses solar power to purify water

The village has been operating it as a business, selling 20-liter bottles of water to residents for 5 pesos — a price that the community agreed upon, and about one-tenth the price of bottled water that is intermittently supplied by a centralized facility an hour’s drive from the village.
At this price, the community reaps a profit of about 49,000 pesos, or $3,600, per year. The community has appointed a committee to manage the incoming funds, setting aside some money for maintenance and repair of the system, and investing the rest back into the community.
“They’re also trying to develop a business plan focused on selling clean water to tourists who come to the local Mayan ruins,” Elasaad says. “So it’s been interesting seeing what they’ve done with this new economy.”

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via news.mit.edu

SEC Adopts Rules to Permit Crowdfunding

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SEC Adopts Rules to Permit Crowdfunding

Permit a company to raise a maximum aggregate amount of $1 million through crowdfunding offerings in a 12-month period;

Permit individual investors, over a 12-month period, to invest in the aggregate across all crowdfunding offerings up to:
If either their annual income or net worth is less than $100,000, than the greater of:
$2,000 or
5 percent of the lesser of their annual income or net worth.
If both their annual income and net worth are equal to or more than $100,000, 10 percent of the lesser of their annual income or net worth; and
During the 12-month period, the aggregate amount of securities sold to an investor through all crowdfunding offerings may not exceed $100,000.

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via sec.gov

Convergence Seeks to Blend Public and Private Investment for Global Development

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Convergence Seeks to Blend Public and Private Investment for Global Development

The world is awash in money for sustainable development. Not the relatively few billions in public-sector foreign aid or philanthropy — the $218 trillion private capital market. By bringing together investors with different risk tolerances and return expectations, Convergence aims to overcome the obstacles that have kept capital out of markets and sectors where it’s needed most. Public and philanthropic funders can mitigate risks for private investors with first-loss protections or loan-guarantees.

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via convergence.finance

Impact Investing: Time to Unleash PRIs

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Impact Investing: Time to Unleash PRIs

PRIs offer foundations a multitude of benefits. They go toward the 5 percent distribution requirement, and they avoid both the excess business holdings tax and the “jeopardizing investment” regulations. Most importantly, unlike a grant, PRIs generate a real financial return and help foundations diversify their holdings. This begs the obvious question: Why are so few doing it?

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via ssir.org

Billions in Change: 5-Hour Energy CEO Develops Clean Energy, Water Projects

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Billions in Change: 5-Hour Energy CEO Develops Clean Energy, Water Projects

Billions in Change is a movement to save the world by creating and implementing solutions to the most basic global problems – water, energy and health. Doing so will raise billions of people out of poverty and improve the lives of everyone – rich and poor.We are a $100 million stage 2 investment fund established to accelerate the large-scale commercialization of innovative, patentable technologies in the global market.

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via stage2innovations.com

Activist Foundations’ ‘Impact Investing’ Pays Off, Sometimes After Court Fight

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Activist Foundations’ ‘Impact Investing’ Pays Off, Sometimes After Court Fight

Impact investing, or mission investing, is an umbrella term for investments that generate both a social impact and financial return. Some foundations decided that, given the riskiness of investing, maybe they should invest in enterprises aligned with their mission. A common type of impact investing called program-related investments still represents just a fraction of the total $54 billion in foundations’ philanthropic spending in 2014. But impact investing is not for every foundation, or even most. Many investments take a long time to pay off, if they ever do, and many small foundations don’t have the luxury of taking money away from local grant-making.

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via wsj.com